My Little Story

I feel so much satisfaction watching the word count grow in the little story flowing from my pen. This joyful enterprise, this crafting of a universe built from memories of a lifetime. This imaginary world I have peopled with those I’ve grown up with, played, schooled, worshiped, worked, and served with. Decorated with scenes that have thrilled my eyes and my mind and lifted my … Continue reading My Little Story

Black and White, Not in Vain

We didn’t invent the present, We’re only reliving the past; Nothing we do today is A vote that’s never been cast. Life is all about growing, Not looking back with remorse; We’ll apologize once for our sins, We will not rehash them once more. We didn’t choose the future, and had Nothing to do with the past; why Second guess the sins of our fathers; … Continue reading Black and White, Not in Vain

Practiced, Pitched, Punched

Well, I pitched to five agents during the SavvyAuthors September Pitch Fest. All five shot me down. Between them, they must have received over a thousand pitches. Some writers pitched to all of the agents (there were publishing house editors too, but I didn’t pitch to them). Out of the ninety requests from those agents for full or partial manuscripts, I was not one of … Continue reading Practiced, Pitched, Punched

A WWII Native American Nurse in the ETO – Intermission Story (15)

Originally posted on Pacific Paratrooper:
Lt. Ryan The short, soft-spoken former Army nurse was asked how she coped with the harsh realities of working in an Army hospital in war-torn Europe during World War II. You could hear a pin drop as this 96-year-old veteran nurse stood under the shade of a small tent outside the Fort Meade Museum at Sturgis, South Dakota on 7/17/16.… Continue reading A WWII Native American Nurse in the ETO – Intermission Story (15)

Reblog: do you remember

Originally posted on clairevetica:
Photo by Bruno Nascimento on Unsplash ? Do you remember do you remember the minutiae of a world in the cracks of a bluestone wall where sparkling bits of gravel and sand and tiny rocks would nestle and we’d trickle them through our fingers carefully arranging them in little piles do you remember the hollows in the ground behind curves of… Continue reading Reblog: do you remember

The Frog and the Granite Shore

Originally posted on Writers Envy:
I walked through a wood one late summer’s day, Afternoon light dappled a forest glade; Lily pad in green-black pond and on it lay A frog whose languid croak appeared to say, As he scratched white belly in sun’s warm ray, I shall not move on this late summer’s day. I stopped to ponder my neighbor in green, Who, eyes… Continue reading The Frog and the Granite Shore

Write Crisp – Word Choice

I apologize if the new title for my writing posts makes you hungry. I cannot stop thinking of Rice Crispies; does any cereal hold more sugar? As a ten-year old boy, I reached for unsweetened cereal in the cupboard. I wanted to choose the amount of sugar on my own. Some cereals tantalized my tongue with lots of added sugar, while others were delicious with … Continue reading Write Crisp – Word Choice

Write Tight? Or Write Crisp?

So, there I was, reading calmkate’s response to today’s Daily Prompt, Crisp, and, as is my wont, pondering ways to submit an outside-the-box response of my own. That led to a headache which made me stop thinking and make some tea (Stash brand Licorice Spice, BTW). Two tea bag tea, too (yeah, I know, but I drink tea out of a huge coffee mug). Writing … Continue reading Write Tight? Or Write Crisp?

Mr. Grundy’s English Class

I often see writers use the term “aircrafts” when referring to two or more aircraft. “Aircraft” is the correct term for both singular and plural cases. Example the first: “The aircraft flew until it ran out of fuel. Then it made a sudden landing.” Example the second: “The aircraft were parked wingtip to wingtip making them easy targets for strafing by treacherous seagulls. It’s one … Continue reading Mr. Grundy’s English Class

Wake of the Wahoo, a non-Book Review Review

I’ve never written a book review; this is not one, sort of. Book critics who use William Faulkner words and philosophical language to sell books, or not, intimidate me so I leave that skill to others. However, Wake of the Wahoo, by Forest J. Sterling, struck a chord with me and I wanted to share a few observations. Wake of the Wahoo is the story of … Continue reading Wake of the Wahoo, a non-Book Review Review

Untitled

Originally posted on Writing from poetry with a small p.:
Wild garlic flowers; White stars scattered in shade of beech. Bluebells; bruises between. Horse chestnut blossoms, gathered in cones, point to the sky. Cabbage White butterflies perform duties with light strokes and the surest of touches. A level land sits still. The remains of a pastel wedding party’s chatter and distant traffic hums speckle the… Continue reading Untitled

Reblog: Filipina Heroine

Originally posted on Pacific Paratrooper:
Magdalena Leones The Silver Star is the third-highest honor for gallantry in the U.S. Armed Forces. Previous recipients include Audie Murphy, Chuck Yeager, and Norman Schwartzkopf. But few people have heard of Magdalena Leones – she was a Filipino woman that served as a guerrilla soldier under U.S. command in World War II. Leones was in her 20s when she… Continue reading Reblog: Filipina Heroine

Reblog: The Archivist– Lenara Lenquil Adventures– Chapter 2

Originally posted on Anna Dobritt — Author:
? Chapter 2 ? “Here we are. Home sweet home.” Lennie unlocked the door to her apartment. “Bathroom is at the end of the hall; towels and washcloths in the cabinet under the sink.” She set several bags on the floor. “Wow! You have more books here!” Lennie smiled. “Feel free to read any of them, but use… Continue reading Reblog: The Archivist– Lenara Lenquil Adventures– Chapter 2

Rejected. Spurned. Snubbed. Repudiated.

A poetry site rejected seven poems I submitted for consideration. The editor thanked me for submitting my work and remarked that “It was a pleasure to read. However, we regret to say that it doesn’t quite fit our daily menu.” Ouch. Seven rejections with one salvo. The submission guidelines encouraged poets to send “your best work” since publishing space was tight. Ouch.Ouch.Ouch.Ouch.Ouch.Ouch.Ouch. Rejected AND repudiated. … Continue reading Rejected. Spurned. Snubbed. Repudiated.

In One Sentence

The thought occurred to me a few minutes ago that I wouldn’t know how to respond if I were asked to describe myself in one sentence. Oprah: “Welcome Will, and congratulations on the publication of your Great American Novel, A Wished-For Love, debuting at number one on the NYT, LAT, ChiTrib, WSJ, Sing Sing, and Tampa Bay Voc. Tech High School Best Sellers Lists! What an … Continue reading In One Sentence

Happy Anniversary!

Six years ago today, I registered on WordPress. How has my writing progressed? Well, let’s see. I joined my first writing group, Writers World on Facebook, in May 2014. I submitted a 500-word extract of my draft novel, Honey ko, for critique that same day. I sat back, confident that my writing would be nominated for acclaim and recognition. Hoo boy. Was I wrong. Although … Continue reading Happy Anniversary!

Sharing! Because I didn’t always share with my sisters…. ;-)

I just want to take this time to thank everyone who reads, subscribers and shares my site. I appreciate all the support and encouragement.I would love to read everyone’s blog, but I don’t always get a chance to read and follow everyone’s blog. So today I want to offer a networking opportunity and a chance […] via Networking + Share Your Blog — Jay Colby Continue reading Sharing! Because I didn’t always share with my sisters…. 😉

Character Vs. Role, & How to Apply One to the Other

Originally posted on A Wordie Discovery:
There are two elements that make up every character ever – character and role. Character refers to personality and nature, whereas role refers to the function and purpose that characters have in the grand scheme of things. The two are of equal importance when crafting a literary character, and can be used to compliment or deflect each other in… Continue reading Character Vs. Role, & How to Apply One to the Other

The Satisfied Life

When I was in the Navy, I was stationed, among many other places, in Brunswick, Maine, and Barbers Point, Hawaii. At both duty stations, there were places overlooking the sea that I frequently visited to relax, take photos, and swim or scramble around the cliff faces. In Maine, that place was on Bailey Island at a place along the cliffs called The Giant’s Stairs. There … Continue reading The Satisfied Life

Chilly Willy

Winter appears to have returned with a vengeance over the weekend. The high in Southern Maryland yesterday was forty-three degrees, and may reach thirty-four today. I’m not one to complain about the cold (except for a cold seat-of-ease; don’t they make heated ones?), and believe temperatures this cold should be accompanied by snow. My northern friends may cast eye darts at me, but I don’t … Continue reading Chilly Willy

William Goodfellow

William Goodfellow was a man, not an animal. William dashed the hoe from his hands and stared at the earth packed beneath his torn fingernails. “This is madness. I am a man, not an animal,” he cried, and fled his field of corn and the blazing sun that burned his head. William’s farm animals howled and barked, and mooed and clucked in amazement, stamped their paws … Continue reading William Goodfellow